The End of the Rainbow

In her book, The End of the Rainbow: How Educating for HAPPINESS (Not Money) Would Transform Our Schools, Susan Engel describes eight dispositions that she believes schools should help students develop so that they can live happier lives. These eight dispositions include:

  1. Engagement: Become immersed in complex and meaningful activities
  2. Purpose: Develop a sense of purpose
  3. Curiosity: Acquire an eagerness for knowledge, and the ability to get it
  4. Thoughtfulness: Think about things fully
  5. Mastery: Become good at things
  6. Contribute to one’s community
  7. Appreciate and understand those who are different from you
  8. Read for pleasure and for information

Engel then goes on to discuss concrete goals that go hand-in-hand with the aforementioned dispositions:

  1. Give students the opportunity to have sustained, varied, and meaningful conversations.
  2. Help students develop a love for reading by letting them read whatever they want.
  3. Teach students to embrace those who are not like themselves by teaching them how to work together toward achieving a common goal.
  4. Focus more on what students want to learn and encourage students to ask their own questions.
  5. Each child should be doing at least one thing he or she is passionate about and developing expertise in that area.
  6. Adults should make the effort to truly get to know the students.

Engel also suggests a new system of assessment to evaluate how effective schools are at developing these key qualities. Randomly recording classroom interactions throughout the school year encourages teachers to focus on goals like encouraging collaboration among students and piquing student curiosity as much as possible.

While Engel does provide convincing arguments as to why students would benefit from an education that develops the eight dispositions listed in the beginning, I’m still doubtful as to how feasible it would be to prioritize happiness in schools. At the end of the day, the current college and job application processes rely on measuring individual student achievement, which does not seem immediately compatible with Engel’s model. I am all for using Engel’s ideas in extracurricular programs (e.g. CodeIt), but it seems like other facets of society must change in order for parents and schools to truly feel comfortable embracing her suggestions.

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