Final semester goals

I’m more than a week into my last semester at MIT, but I figured now is as good a time as any to think about my goals for the semester.

  1. Prioritize spending time with friends. Most college graduates whom I’ve spoken to explain that what they miss the most about college is how easy it is to have impromptu hangouts with friends. Once people start working, it’s much harder to coordinate times when everyone is free. Also, this goal will help me justify doing fun things when I just don’t feel like working. Senioritis is real…
  2. Be patient with myself when classes get challenging. I’m taking 6.824 (Distributed Systems) this semester, which has a reputation for being a very difficult class. Instead of getting really worked up and anxious, I’m making it a goal to be patient with myself, slowly identify areas of difficulty and/or confusion, and work through them one by one.
  3. Go to talks and read books. I’m taking a relatively light load this semester, so during weeks when I don’t have to spend as much time on MEET and CodeIt, I want to make sure I “broaden my perspective” on the world by attending talks on or off campus and/or read books from my evergrowing list of books to read. Just last week, I attended a two-hour talk given by two formerly incarcerated individuals, and I’m so glad I did. I think this was the first time I’ve ever attended an event where all the participants were engaged throughout the full two hours.
  4. Make time to exercise and practice clarinet. I’ve learned that exercising and playing music reduce my stress levels, so even when I feel like I’m crunched for time, I need to prioritize these two activities. I have found that even 10 minutes of stretching in the morning makes me less anxious throughout the day.
  5. Limit the sugar intake (maybe 2 times per week). At some point last semester, I was eating green tea ice cream from the dining hall almost every morning for breakfast. I’m going to do that less often this semester.

Okay, so that’s that. Now we just have to see how well I can stick to these goals this semester 😛

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That’s All Folks!

Teaching STEM in Korea

It’s only been five days since our STEM camp ended and already I miss my students, my team, and Seoul. I’m proud of my team for putting together a successful workshop, and I’m proud of my students for working so hard during these past two weeks.

DSC02587.jpg Two of our students made us a thank you poster!

For my final blog post, I thought I would highlight some of the most memorable parts of this trip for me. Obviously, if you want more details, you should just read the rest of the blog 🙂

Projects

During the afternoons of Days 7 through 9, we had the students choose and work on their own final project. We wanted to give students the opportunity to explore their favorite workshop activity in greater depth.

There were some concerns with regard to how successful an open-ended project would be with this particular group of students…

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Internet, VR, Dry Ice, and More

Teaching STEM in Korea

During the next two mornings, we covered a variety of topics including the internet, virtual reality, and dry ice.

My first internet simulation activity (adapted from Code.org) was based on the game Battleship. However, rather than have multiple ships and only one opponent, this version allowed a single player to place one battleship for each of three opponents. Because this was an internet simulation, students had to communicate their intent to attack a particular board space by passing notes with To/From fields and the board coordinates. The message recipient would then indicate whether the chosen board coordinate was a hit or a miss. Once the students got the hang of the game, some actually got really into it.

IMG_5457.jpg Battleship internet simulation

Three students were absent, so Emily kindly stepped in and played as all three of them.

IMG_5458.jpg Emily playing three games of Battleship

For the second internet simulation, I put together…

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Biology Day

Teaching STEM in Korea

Week 2 started off with a morning dedicated to biology activities. Emily whipped out her signature microscope lab, which has been a hit for three consecutive years. The students had a blast competing against each other to locate specific objects on various bills and coins.

IMG_5392.jpg Students competing in the money-search competition

For the next activity, students learned about viruses and built their own models of the HIV and Zika viruses.

DSC02208.jpg Paper models of viruses

The students also tried their hand at performing surgery…on bananas. Practicing interrupted and continuous stitches on bananas was definitely a crowd-favorite. Some students loved the activity so much that they wanted to know exactly when they could suture bananas again.

DSC02224.jpg Interrupted stitches on a banana

In the afternoon, Emily taught the students how to use the Raspberry Pi camera. With just a few lines of code, the students were able to create their very own photo booth complete…

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Spontaneous Sunday Excursions

Teaching STEM in Korea

On Sunday of Week 2, Emu and I originally planned on visiting Gyeongbokgung Palace for an hour or two before returning back to the apartment to work. Instead, we ended up staying out for more than five hours because we kept finding new attractions to explore in the area.

After leaving the palace, we crossed the street to visit the statue of King Sejong the Great, the creator of Hangul. We noticed there was an entrance to something called King Sejong Story at the base of the statue, so we decided to check it out. We expected to see a single room showcase highlighting his life accomplishments, but instead, we discovered an entire exhibition with 9 different sections covering 3,200 square meters.

The exhibition also linked to the KT building and the Sejong Center for Performing Arts. I’m not sure exactly where we were at the time, but Emu and I found…

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Making things move

Teaching STEM in Korea

On Friday, Shine started off the day with mousetrap cars. The students seemed to enjoy putting all the pieces together, and we just so happened to have duct tape that matched the colors of each time (i.e. pink, yellow, green, and blue). Emily sacrificed a pen to show the students what would happen if someone’s finger got caught in the mousetrap. I think that demonstration sufficiently scared the students and made them work more cautiously.

Once everyone had a working mousetrap car, we raced them. I even drew a makeshift checkered flag, green flag, and a diagonally divided black-and-white flag. In case anyone is interested, a diagonally divided black-and-white flag is used to indicate a penalty for unsportsmanlike conduct, at least according to Wikipedia. I felt super cool waving around my flag, but I think Emu and Emily carried their flags just to appease me.

The next activity was nail…

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All hands on deck

Teaching STEM in Korea

Even the most controlling one realizes that the others can be employed as labor.

—Emily Damato (January 11, 2018 at Yeomyung School)

Day 3

In the morning, Emu taught a module on circuits, which included an activity where students deconstructed a flashlight, made their own flashlights, played a game to learn how to read resistors, and built simple circuits using a breadboard. The flashlight activity was a big hit with all the students, though, for some reason, none of them actually wanted to keep their flashlights after they made them.

Some students were more interested in circuits than others, and some students also came in with much more experience building circuits than others. The group that I worked with got pretty frustrated with all the wires, but when we finally got the button to turn on the LED light, I could see how surprised (but happy) they were that it actually…

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