Biology Day

Teaching STEM in Korea

Week 2 started off with a morning dedicated to biology activities. Emily whipped out her signature microscope lab, which has been a hit for three consecutive years. The students had a blast competing against each other to locate specific objects on various bills and coins.

IMG_5392.jpg Students competing in the money-search competition

For the next activity, students learned about viruses and built their own models of the HIV and Zika viruses.

DSC02208.jpg Paper models of viruses

The students also tried their hand at performing surgery…on bananas. Practicing interrupted and continuous stitches on bananas was definitely a crowd-favorite. Some students loved the activity so much that they wanted to know exactly when they could suture bananas again.

DSC02224.jpg Interrupted stitches on a banana

In the afternoon, Emily taught the students how to use the Raspberry Pi camera. With just a few lines of code, the students were able to create their very own photo booth complete…

View original post 120 more words

Making things move

Teaching STEM in Korea

On Friday, Shine started off the day with mousetrap cars. The students seemed to enjoy putting all the pieces together, and we just so happened to have duct tape that matched the colors of each time (i.e. pink, yellow, green, and blue). Emily sacrificed a pen to show the students what would happen if someone’s finger got caught in the mousetrap. I think that demonstration sufficiently scared the students and made them work more cautiously.

Once everyone had a working mousetrap car, we raced them. I even drew a makeshift checkered flag, green flag, and a diagonally divided black-and-white flag. In case anyone is interested, a diagonally divided black-and-white flag is used to indicate a penalty for unsportsmanlike conduct, at least according to Wikipedia. I felt super cool waving around my flag, but I think Emu and Emily carried their flags just to appease me.

The next activity was nail…

View original post 317 more words

All hands on deck

Teaching STEM in Korea

Even the most controlling one realizes that the others can be employed as labor.

—Emily Damato (January 11, 2018 at Yeomyung School)

Day 3

In the morning, Emu taught a module on circuits, which included an activity where students deconstructed a flashlight, made their own flashlights, played a game to learn how to read resistors, and built simple circuits using a breadboard. The flashlight activity was a big hit with all the students, though, for some reason, none of them actually wanted to keep their flashlights after they made them.

Some students were more interested in circuits than others, and some students also came in with much more experience building circuits than others. The group that I worked with got pretty frustrated with all the wires, but when we finally got the button to turn on the LED light, I could see how surprised (but happy) they were that it actually…

View original post 820 more words

Murphy’s Law Strikes

Teaching STEM in Korea

In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.

–Dwight D. Eisenhower

We’ve officially made it through the first two days of camp! It has been an exhausting two days, but I’ve really enjoyed getting to know our students, and we’ve accomplished a lot already.

IMG_5107 Classroom all set-up and ready to go!

On day 1, Emily spent the morning teaching the students basic English words like “help” and “repeat.” Most of the students were already familiar with the words, but they seemed to enjoy playing our word games anyway. We played a modified version of tag that transfers the role of “it” to different players when various vocabulary words are said aloud.

I also got a chance to practice the four sentences of Korean that I knew! Apparently, the question “Do you need help?” sounds pretty similar to “Do you need money?” because…

View original post 1,368 more words

last first day of school

I can already tell this semester is going to be incredible. After several semesters of taking classes simply to fill requirements, I’ve finally made it to the part where I get to fill my schedule with only classes that I actually want to take.

I was talking to a sophomore friend the other day about whether or not she thinks she changed a lot during her freshman year, and I loved her response. She said that she doesn’t think she necessarily “changed” a lot, but she definitely discovered more about who she is as a person. I love that description because it really resonates with me and how I think being in college has transformed me as an individual. For the most part, my interests actually have not changed that much since high school, but the process of trying out different things has made me more conscious of what I really enjoy and care about.

Without further ado, I hereby announce the class lineup for the semester, as well as my personal goals to kick off my last year as an undergraduate student.

  • 6.809 Interactive Music Systems: About 70 students pre-registered for this class, which has only 18 spots. I am so grateful to be one of those 18 students, especially after attending the first class today. The instructor Eran Egozy was not only one of the adjudicators during my clarinet audition last year (and probably this year), but he is also one of the founders of Harmonix, the company that created Rock Band and Guitar Hero (no big deal). My friends who took this class last semester had nothing to say but good things about both Egozy and the curriculum itself. From what I can tell from the first day of class, 6.809 is going to be awesome. I mean, what better way to combine computer science and music than to learn how to enable everyone to experience the joy of making music?
  • 6.828 Operating Systems: We’re taking it a notch down by exploring how operating systems work. My computer systems class last semester (6.033) gave an overview of the Unix file system, virtual machines, and the shell, but we pretty much covered all the OS-related topics from 6.033 in one 6.828 lecture. Needless to say that this will be quite a challenging journey, but fortunately, I have a bunch of friends in this class with me.
  • 6.175 Constructive Computer Architecture: My sophomore fall, I took computation structures (6.004), which introduced the building blocks of digital systems. 6.175 is a follow-up class that focuses on implementing different versions of pipelined machines and culminating in implementing a multicore processor. Pretty gnarly stuff. Other than the fact that only 10% of the class is female, this class seems super interesting, and I really like Professor Arvind’s lecture style. Today he drew an analogy comparing Picasso’s 75 or so recreations of Diego Velázquez’s “Las Meninas” to our own recreations of pipelined processors. This class will also hopefully make me a more useful lab assistant for 6.004 this semester.

Other highlights from today, which I will use to segue into two of my major goals for this semester.

  • Be kind. One of the first things I did when I moved in a few days ago was put up some banner paper so that I could create the Sharpie mural I’ve wanted since last year. At the top, I wrote the words “be kind” in big letters. Those are the words I wake up to every morning and remind myself of throughout the day. To me, it’s a reminder to be kind to others and to be kind to myself. Quick example: Today I bought lunch at Stata, and when I asked the checkout person how he was doing, he said excellent and gave me a smile. After paying, I made sure to wish him an excellent rest of the day, to which he responded, “Thanks. I appreciate it,” and gave me a smile in return. It took no more than two seconds on my part, and I won’t claim to have made a huge difference in the world or anything, but it felt good to have contributed to making another person smile at least once more today.
  • Relax and make time for friends. In stark contrast to freshman year when I was frantically trying to make friends, I actually have an incredible support system now. Everywhere I turn, I see familiar faces. It’s still the beginning of the semester, but since it’s the last time all of us will be living on campus together, I want to prioritize making time to hang out with my friends.

Stay tuned for thoughts on my other two classes, which have yet to start… 🙂

The End of the Rainbow

In her book, The End of the Rainbow: How Educating for HAPPINESS (Not Money) Would Transform Our Schools, Susan Engel describes eight dispositions that she believes schools should help students develop so that they can live happier lives. These eight dispositions include:

  1. Engagement: Become immersed in complex and meaningful activities
  2. Purpose: Develop a sense of purpose
  3. Curiosity: Acquire an eagerness for knowledge, and the ability to get it
  4. Thoughtfulness: Think about things fully
  5. Mastery: Become good at things
  6. Contribute to one’s community
  7. Appreciate and understand those who are different from you
  8. Read for pleasure and for information

Engel then goes on to discuss concrete goals that go hand-in-hand with the aforementioned dispositions:

  1. Give students the opportunity to have sustained, varied, and meaningful conversations.
  2. Help students develop a love for reading by letting them read whatever they want.
  3. Teach students to embrace those who are not like themselves by teaching them how to work together toward achieving a common goal.
  4. Focus more on what students want to learn and encourage students to ask their own questions.
  5. Each child should be doing at least one thing he or she is passionate about and developing expertise in that area.
  6. Adults should make the effort to truly get to know the students.

Engel also suggests a new system of assessment to evaluate how effective schools are at developing these key qualities. Randomly recording classroom interactions throughout the school year encourages teachers to focus on goals like encouraging collaboration among students and piquing student curiosity as much as possible.

While Engel does provide convincing arguments as to why students would benefit from an education that develops the eight dispositions listed in the beginning, I’m still doubtful as to how feasible it would be to prioritize happiness in schools. At the end of the day, the current college and job application processes rely on measuring individual student achievement, which does not seem immediately compatible with Engel’s model. I am all for using Engel’s ideas in extracurricular programs (e.g. CodeIt), but it seems like other facets of society must change in order for parents and schools to truly feel comfortable embracing her suggestions.

Junior Spring Postmortem

This is my usual end-of-semester postmortem. I’ll try to address some of the goals I outlined at the beginning of the semester and gauge how successful or unsuccessful I was at achieving those goals.

Invest time in people.

Meets expectations.

  • Although many of my friends were occupied with their busy schedules this semester, I still managed to show my support by attending their dance performances and the like.
  • I also shared a lot of meals in the dining hall with friends. Rather than eat all my meals alone, if I felt up for having company, I made it a point to text at least one or two people to join me.
  • I’m also glad to say that through my diverse set of classes, I met some new friends, who were able to share personal experiences of theirs here and there.

Don’t sweat the small stuff.

Exceeds expectations.

  • I think I did surprisingly well with this goal. In fact, I might have gotten dangerously close to apathy. Whoops.
  • My attitude this semester was generally to do the best I could at each step of the way without stressing too much about the details.
  • For example, I used to care a lot about getting every single question correct on exams, but this semester, my strategy became to study as much as I needed to feel confident going into the exam. I carefully answered each question to the best of my ability, but I wouldn’t dwell too much on those that I wasn’t sure about. This lowered my stress levels significantly, which allowed me to move on to my next task immediately after taking an exam.

Communicate effectively.

Meets expectations.

  • My Voice and Speech for the Actor class is pretty relevant to this goal. One of the most mind-blowing discoveries I made this semester was the realization that delivery is just as important as content. In fact, some would argue delivery is more important than content. You can express two entirely different ideas by adding different vocal choices to the same sequence of words.
  • When I made this goal, I was mainly concerned with my ability to explain concepts to my 6.042 students. In the end, I think I did quite well. The part that made the biggest difference was preparation. When I looked through the problems ahead of time, I found that it was much easier to give coherent explanations on how to solve the problems. This was true even when I held my review sessions.
  • My computer systems engineering class was my first technical communication-intensive class. Although it was a lot of work, I certainly learned a lot about reading technical computer science papers and writing system critique and design papers. I certainly have lots of room for improvement, but I think I made good progress this semester.

Be willing to ditch your plans.

Exceeds expectations.

  • I had my fair share of ditching plans to study in favor of going out with friends on Friday afternoons. I still managed to complete my work somehow, and I’m glad to say that I feel just that much closer to the friends I spent more time with.
  • It’s fair to say that I pretty much “winged” it this entire semester.

Conclusion

Honestly, this past semester was probably my least favorite out of the six I have completed so far. I ended up taking a lot of classes simply to fulfill requirements, and unfortunately, I simply didn’t enjoy some of them. On the bright side, during my remaining time in school, I’ll have the freedom to take classes I’m actually interested in!

My biggest achievement this semester was teaching the inaugural CodeIt App Inventor class. There are things I’d like to change for the future, but I’m quite happy that nothing crashed and burned entirely. I have a running list of improvements to implement for next semester, and I’m looking forward to seeing how much better we can make the program within the next year.

Believe it or not, taking the acting class made me a better musician. Although I am still far from ever becoming a professional clarinetist, I now have a better sense of what it means to make “vocal choices” in the context of music. At least my chamber teacher seems to think I have improved a lot this semester 😛

Lastly, I wanted to say a few words about participating in the engineering leadership program this year. Although the leadership classes were not my favorite, taking the end-of-year cumulative quizzes made me realize just how much content we covered over the course of eight or so months. I’m by no means an expert in everything we learned, but at least I’ve had some exposure to the various concepts. As with many things in life, leadership takes time and practice to develop, but through this program I was able to soldify my foundation just a bit more.

Play

A childhood devoid of play is not a childhood. I never thought much about how integral “play” was to my childhood, but after hearing Scot Osterweil give a presentation to my education class yesterday, I have a much deeper appreciation for the art of inspiring play through games.

In his talk, Osterweil discussed the “Four Freedoms of Play,” which unfortunately are stifled by the traditional school structure:

  1. Freedom to Explore
  2. Freedom to Fail
  3. Freedom of Identity
  4. Freedom of Effort

Although these four freedoms are not generally found in schools, they are actually quite inducive to learning. Osterweil’s projects are founded on the idea that by engaging children in play—actual play, not just educational content disguised behind some game mechanics, we can give children opportunities to learn and to enjoy themselves while doing it.

Games like Lure of the Labyrinth and Vanished create learner-centered environments by building on the knowledge that children already have. These games validate the kids’ identities and train the children to see themselves as learners. They set students up for success rather than knock students down with each new concept introduced.

Osterweil also introduced us to the concept of Fermi problems, which are estimation problems that involve making guesses about certain quantities. The example he gave was “How many cups of coffee are consumed in a day in the US?” The idea is that students can pool together their knowledge and come up with a reasonably accurate guess. It gives students the opportunity to think about not only what they know but also how they know it. It’s beautiful.

This sort of organic learning environment reminds me why I love outreach programs. With outreach programs, there isn’t as much pressure to conform to a predetermined set of standards and teaching methods. As a teacher, I can choose to teach with whatever tools I want, which usually means figuring out what the kids enjoy and finding random ways to remind them that learning can be fun.

Side note: I thought it was interesting how my acting teacher also stresses the importance of “play” in theater arts. I think this lines up especially well with “Freedom of Identity” since acting involves committing oneself completely to an entirely different character or identity.

College and Gender through Books

“One of the insights at the core of the college idea—indeed of the idea of community itself—has always been that to serve others is to serve oneself by providing a sense of purpose, thereby countering the loneliness and aimlessness by which all people, young and old, can be afflicted.”

from Andrew Delbanco’s College: What It Was, Is, and Should Be

Over the past two weeks, I’ve been spending more time reading books just for fun. It’s been a good reminder of how I can learn about other people’s perspectives on the world just by cracking open a book. I know I’m not great at writing book reviews, but I do know that articulating my thoughts helps me make better sense of books. So here goes the rambling…

College

Big Idea #1

The first book I finished reading last week was Andrew Delbanco’s College: What It Was, Is, and Should Be. Delbanco talks about how college as an entity first arose in the United States and how it has evolved since then. The message that really stuck with me, though, was the idea that colleges have done a great job of cementing socioeconomic inequality in the United States. A person’s chance at having a high-paying job is higher if he or she attends a brand name college or university. However, at the same time, the children who are most well-equipped for and most likely to be admitted to those institutions are children who already come from families that have a decently high income. These children can afford to attend quality schools and participate in extracurricular activities outside of the classroom. Thus, the people who are more likely to be effective change makers in struggling communities (i.e. people who themselves grew up in these communities) are the people who have significantly more hurdles to overcome to make those changes. According to Delbanco, “it is often students of lesser means for whom college means the most—not just in the measurable sense of improving their economic competitiveness, but in the intellectual and imaginative enlargement it makes possible.” I don’t have any solutions to this problem, but it does remind me to be thankful that I have the opportunity to attend such an incredible institution myself. I think it gives more meaning to all the time I dedicate running outreach programs and making sure they are accessible to as many students as possible.

Big Idea #2

Delbanco also brings up the idea of meritocracy, which was first coined by Michael Young in The Rise of the Meritocracy. Delbanco explains that we have become

a society “dedicated to the one overriding purpose of economic expansion,” in which “people are judged according to the single test of how much they increase production.” In such a society, “the scientist whose invention does the work of ten thousand, or the administrator who organizes clutches of technicians” is counted “among the great,” and intelligence is defined as “the ability to raise production, directly or indirectly.”

Especially at a school like MIT, this statement could not ring truer. But does it have to be that way? I feel myself trying to tear away from this definition of success and coming up with new ideas regarding what it means to live a meaningful life. I haven’t figured out the answer, and maybe I never will, but I definitely think it’s something worth thinking about it personally rather than blindly accepting someone else’s definition.

Gender

This past weekend, I finished reading If I Was Your Girl, a young adult novel written by Meredith Russo, a transgender woman. The book was written from the perspective of a teenage transgender girl, and it opened up my eyes to an entirely different world. It made me realize that it is quite a luxury to feel comfortable living in my own skin. I can only imagine how lonely, confusing, and frustrating it must feel growing up in a body that does not feel like your own and not having anyone around who can explain what you’re feeling. Anyway, the bottom line was that this book made me think about issues I never even knew existed. Although I am by no means an expert on any of this, I know more now than I knew a week ago.

I’m in the middle of another book right now called Symptoms of Being Human, which is told from the perspective of a gender fluid teenager. To be honest, Jeff Garvin’s novel has been a bit harder for me to understand since I’m still trying to wrap my head around the idea of gender fluidity. It is intriguing, though, to read the thoughts that go through the protagonist’s mind, and hopefully, by the end of the novel, I will have a better understanding of the protagonist’s view on identity.

P.S. Maybe it’s just a coincidence, but the protagonists in both If I Was Your Girl and Symptoms of Being Human seem to have a special attachment to the Star Wars saga. Maybe it’s about time I actually watch those movies…

Perks of college

I’ve only had two days of class this semester, but they were enough to remind me of the perks of being a college student (besides the student discounts, of course).

It pushes my boundaries.

After receiving feedback last semester on how monotone I sound when I speak, I decided that it would benefit me greatly to take a course called “Voice and Speech for the Actor.” I’ve heard really great things about the class, which is often overenrolled. I was fortunate enough to have made the cut, and so far the class seems pretty awesome and unlike anything else I’ve done before.

We spent the first day of class learning how to relax our entire bodies and to breathe the right way (btw, my clarinet teacher always nags me to do this, too). The instructor explained that we need to be open to inspiration not only intellectually, but also emotionally and instinctually. This semester, we will be working on intense concentration and relaxation combined with a complete commitment to play.

I was thrown back to my middle school days when I auditioned for the first and last time for our school play. I was so self-conscious of what I was doing that I pretty much laughed through the entire audition; as far I can recall, it wasn’t supposed to be a funny play. Anyway, this whole idea of “complete commitment to play” really resonated with me because it requires you to discard any feelings of self-consciousness and to instead be thoroughly absorbed by whatever you are doing in that moment. It’s a beautiful thing really, and I feel like I could benefit a lot from carrying around that attitude elsewhere in my life.

It brings together a diverse group of intelligent people.

I’ll be honest and say that I wasn’t all too thrilled about having to take the biology general institute requirement this semester. It’s known to be a class full of freshmen, and it also has nothing to do with my major.

That being said, I was pleasantly surprised to learn about the diverse make-up of my recitation section. Only about half the students were freshmen, and the other half consisted of juniors, seniors, graduate students, and even a student originally from the class of 1992, but who took time off and is now taking biology to complete his undergraduate degree. It was a nice reminder that everyone on campus brings a unique perspective and that it’s a privilege to learn alongside them.

Stay tuned for more exciting updates on life in Cambridge, MA.